Children benefit from early dose of measles vaccine

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Children should receive their first dose of the measles vaccine when they are between 1 year and 15 months old to best avoid the side effects of the shot, according to a new report.

Researchers from Kaiser Permanente Colorado’s Institute for Health Research found that when the first dose of the measles immunization is administered earlier, children have a lower increased risk of fever and seizures. The study is published in the Oct. 14 online edition of JAMA Pediatrics.

“We found that the magnitude of increased risk of fever and seizures following immunization with measles-containing vaccines during the second year of life depends on age,” study lead author, Dr. Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, said in a Kaiser Permanente news release.

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“While measles-containing vaccines administered at 12 to 15 months of age are associated with a small risk of fever and seizures following immunization, delayed administration at 16 to 23 months of age results in a greater risk of those adverse events,” Rowhani-Rahbar added.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that all children receive their first of the two-dose series of measles vaccine at 12 to 15 months of age. But, the researchers pointed out, most children receive their first dose between 12 and 23 months of age, and only 85 percent of children had received this immunization by the time they are 19 months old.

Source:
HealthDay

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