Fall in human papillomavirus prevalence following a national vaccination program

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In April 2007, Australia became the first country to introduce a national government-funded human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program. We evaluated the program’s impact on genotype-specific HPV infection prevalence through a repeat survey of women attending clinical services.

The prevalence of vaccine HPV genotypes (6, 11, 16, and 18) was significantly lower in the postvaccine sample than in the prevaccine sample (6.7% vs 28.7%; P < .001), with lower prevalence observed in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women compared with the prevaccine population (5.0% [adjusted odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.06–0.21] and 15.8% [adjusted odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.93], respectively). A slightly lower prevalence of nonvaccine oncogenic HPV genotypes was also found in vaccinated women (30.8% versus 37.6%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.99).

Four years after the commencement of the Australian HPV vaccination program, a substantial decrease in vaccine-targeted genotypes is evident and should, in time, translate into reductions in HPV-related lesions.

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Source:
Journal of Infectious Diseases

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